Category: Canoe/kayak (sprint)

SPECIAL RULES FOR OLYMPIC GAMES

Kayak

In a kayak, the paddler is seated in the direction of travel, and uses a double-bladed paddle. Kayaks have a rudder for steering and course adjustment, which is operated by the feet of the paddler in the front. The paddle used is usually a ‘wing paddle’ (although standard asymmetrical paddles can also be used) – wing paddles have blades which are shaped to resemble a wing or spoon, creating lift and increasing the power and stability of the stroke. There are many variations of said wing paddles, ranging from longer and narrower options for more stability throughout the entire stroke to more extreme ‘teardrop’ shaped paddles for a firmer application of power at the start of the stroke.

Canoe

In a canoe the paddler kneels on one knee with the other leg forward and foot flat on the floor of the boat, and paddles a single-bladed paddle on one side only with what is known as a ‘J-stroke’ to control the boat’s direction.[3] In Canada, a racing class exists for the C-15 or WC or “War Canoe“, as well as a similarly designed C-4 (which is much shorter and more squat than an ‘International’ C-4). An antiquated boat class is the C-7, resembling a large C4 which was debuted by the ICF with little success. For racing canoes, the blade is typically short and broad, with a ‘power face’ on one side that is either flat or scalloped out. The shaft will typically be longer than a tripping canoe paddle, because the kneeling position puts the paddler higher above the surface of the water. More recent designs of canoe racing paddles often have a slight bent shaft, commonly 12-14 degrees. (a concept of canoe designer Eugene Jensen in the 1960s). Many high-performance canoe paddlers prefer the feel of a wooden handle with a carbon fiber shaft and blade, while nearly all high-performance kayak paddlers use paddles made completely of carbon fiber

APPLICATION AND PROGRAMME [GR]
Applications, entries and programme for Olympic Games shall be in
accordance with the rules of the IOC.
Any rule not regulated by the IOC is subject to the relevant ICF rule.
JURY, COMPETITION COMMITTEE AND
OFFICIALS [GR]
In accordance with article 37.
DRAWING OF LOTS [TR]
Drawing of lots shall take place at a time and under the supervision of
persons approved by the IOC.
HEATS AND INTERVALS [TR]
Division into heats shall take place according to the system specified in
articles 35 and 38.
RANKING SYSTEM [TR]
In accordance with IOC System.
COURSE [TR]
In accordance with article 18.
START AND EQUIPMENT [TR]
In accordance with article 22 and 40.
ICF Canoe Sprint Competition Rules 2017
PHOTO-FINISH – TIME KEEPING [TR]
In accordance with article 41.
CHECKING OF BOATS AND EQUIPMENT [TR]
In accordance with article 42.
No form of publicity or propaganda, commercial or otherwise, may appear
on sportswear, accessories or, more generally, on any article of clothing
or equipment whatsoever worn or used by the athletes or other
participants in the Olympic Games.
Boats, accessories and clothing may carry advertising symbols, trademarks
or emblems and words for the identification of the manufacturer of the
article or equipment concerned, provided that such identification shall
not exceed total surface area designated suitable by the IOC.
The word “ identification “ means the normal display of the name,
designation, trademark, logo or any other distinctive sign of the actual
manufacturer of the item only. Third party branding of an article of
equipment or clothing is not permitted. The identification can appear
only once per item unless specified by the IOC.
The uniform of the competitors and all persons holding an official position
may include the flag of their NOC Olympic emblem or, with the consent of
the OCOG, the OCOG Olympic emblem. The ICF officials may wear the
uniform and the emblem of the International Federation.
Any boat, accessory or article of clothing, which does not comply with the
above conditions, will be ineligible for use during the competition. Teams
are responsible for their own equipment.
For a new boat design to be eligible for the Olympic Games the same boat
design must have passed the official boat control at the World
Championships the year prior to the Olympic Games.
At the Olympic Games the names of the competitors will be placed on the
side of the boats. The names (letters) on the stickers should be placed
just below the cockpit. The precise positioning will be determined by the
ICF Technical Delegate.
ICF Canoe Sprint Competition Rules 2017
The dimension of the names on the stickers will be a minimum of 6 cm
high and will be black letters on white background. The font should be
“Arial Black” all in capital letters with first name or initial followed by
family name.
These stickers will be provided by the Organising Committee. They will
be applied by the ICF Officials at the first Boat Control.

Canoe sport (Sprint)

CANOE SPRINT HAS TWO DIFFERENT TYPES OF CRAFT, THE KAYAK AND THE CANOE. THE KAYAK PROBABLY ORIGINATES FROM GREENLAND, WHERE IT WAS USED BY THE ESKIMOS, PRIMARILY FOR HUNTING, FISHING AND TRANSPORTATION. THE CANOE WAS USED ALL OVER THE WORLD AS A METHOD OF TRANSPORTATION, TRADE AND WAR. THE FIRST OFFICIAL SPORTING EVENTS WERE CREATED UTILISING BOTH OF THESE CRAFTS DURING THE MID-19TH CENTURY. CANOE SPRINT HAS BEEN THE TRADITIONAL FORM OF RACING SINCE THE INCEPTION.

HISTORY AND BASICS

The word kayak, meaning “man-boat” in Eskimo, was found predominately in North America, Siberia and Greenland. They were ideal for individual transport and were used primarily for hunting and fishing. The canoe, on the other hand, was used on a wider scale. From Native American tribes to the Polynesians, the canoe had a variety uses, primarily transport, trade and warfare. The basics of Canoe sprint are simple. Get to the finish as fast as possible, the fastest person wins.

CANOE/KAYAK DIFFÉRENCES

The design of canoes varied, depending on their use and where they were built; they varied between open-topped bark canoes to dug-out trees to 130ft war canoes. In contrast, kayaks were built to ensure icy Arctic water did not enter the boat. They were made by stretching animal skins over a wooden frame and could generally only carry one man at a time. Kayaks are closed boats with a cockpit for sitting in. Athletes paddle from a sitting position with a double-blade paddle. Canoes are open boats paddled from a kneeling position with a single-blade paddle.

FIRST COMPETITION

Canoe sport competitions began in the mid-19th century. The Royal Canoe Club of London was formed in 1866 and was the first organisation interested in developing the sport. In 1871 the New York Canoe Club was founded. The first women’s competition was organised in Russia. By the 1890s, canoe sport was popular all over the European continent. Since canoe sprints entered the Olympics in 1936, its events have changed and adapted in order to improve its overall standing and follow current trends and boat technological advances.

OLYMPIC HISTORY

In 1924 in Paris, flatwater canoeing featured at the Games as a demonstration sport. It became an Olympic discipline in Berlin in 1936. Later, some of its events disappeared to make way for new ones.

Overall, Europe dominates this sport, at both the Olympic Games and the World Championships, winning 90 per cent of the medals up for grabs. Since the 1948 Games in London, women have competed in the kayak event only. Today, the Olympic canoe/kayak flatwater programme comprises a total of 12 events.

The recent trend is towards reducing the course distance. At the beginning, in the World Championships, the courses were staged over 1,000 and 10,000 metres for men and 5,000 metres for women. Today, they are over distances of 200, 500 and 1 000 metres. The Olympic events take place over 500 and 1,000 metres.

For the 2012 Games in London, the three men’s flatwater 500 metres events will be replaced by 200m events.

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