Category: BMX racing

BMX racing

BMX racing is a type of off-road bicycle racing. The format of BMX was derived from motocross racing. BMX bicycle races are sprint races on purpose-built off-road single-lap race tracks. The track usually consists of a starting gate for up to eight racers, a groomed, serpentine, dirt race course made of various jumps and rollers and a finish line. The course is usually flat, about 15 feet (4.6 m) wide and has large banked corners that help the riders maintain speed.

Bikes sizes
There are two BMX racing bikes sizes. One is the 20″ wheel bike. This bike is common with minors and is currently the most common class. The Cruiser bikes are any bikes with a 24″ wheel. However, any bikes that have a wheel larger than 24″ will still be considered Cruisers. Cruisers are more common with older racers and is rapidly growing. The cruiser style bike tends to be easier to jump and rolls better while the 20″ is seemingly more agile.[1]

Advantages
While BMX racing is an individual sport, teams are often formed from racers in different classifications for camaraderie and often for business exposure of a sponsoring organization or company. BMX racing rewards strength, quickness, and bike handling. Many successful BMX racers have gone on to leverage their skills in other forms of bicycle and motorcycle competitions.[1]

Track features
There are all types of BMX jumps, ranging from small rollers to massive step-up doubles. There are pro straights which are for junior and elite men. They are all doubles which range from about 6 m to 12 m, while “Class” straights have more flow and have many more range of jumps.[1]

Starting hill

The Starting hill marks the start of the track. Most BMX Tracks have a gate. The starting hill will normally provide all the speed for the remainder of the race. Generally, the larger the hill, the faster, so pro hills are much larger than the amateur ones.

Step-up

A jump of which’s landing is at a higher point than the jump itself

Berms

Turns are at an angle. Therefore, you can easily turn without having to brake.

Double

The double are two hills close to each other.

Step-down

A hill, then followed by a shorter hill.

Roller

A small hill, normally in groups.

Tabletop

A flat jump, normally for learning to jump.

Pro Set

A set of jumps with only a takeoff lip and a landing, usually spaced 7 to 15 apart.

Olympics
BMX racing became a medal sport at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing under the UCI sanctioning body. Sanctioning body of the United States of America is USA BMX. USA BMX is certified under the UCI (International Cycling Union), which is recognized by the Olympic Committee

BMX racing

BMX RACING TOOK OFF IN CALIFORNIA, INSPIRED BY MOTOCROSS. IT FAST BECAME POPULAR AND MADE ITS OLYMPIC DEBUT AT THE 2008 BEIJING GAMES.

CALIFORNIA BORN

Bicycle motocross (BMX) started in the late 1960s in California, around the time that motocross became a popular sport in the USA. The motorised version of the sport was the inspiration for the human-powered competition.

BMX SPREADS WORLDWIDE

BMX racing offered exciting action at a low cost and the infant sport became an instant hit, especially in California. This led to the foundation of a sanctioning body for BMX in the USA in the early 1970s. Over the following decade, the sport gradually gained in international popularity.

OFFICIAL INTERNATIONAL SPORT

In April 1981, the International BMX Federation was founded. BMX rapidly developed a unique sporting identity and it became evident that the sport had more in common with cycling than motorcycling. This was officially recognised in 1993 when BMX was fully integrated into the International Cycling Union (UCI). The sport made its Olympic debut at the 2008 Beijing Games.

OLYMPIC HISTORY

It was in 2008 in Beijing that BMX made its debut on the Olympic programme. The men’s event was won by Latvia’s Maris Strombergs. In the women’s event, it was France’s Anne-Caroline Chausson who took the first Olympic title in this discipline.

BMX is one of the fastest and youngest cycling disciplines. Its principle is simple: eight riders compete on a track filled with jumps, tight bends and obstacles. In Beijing, the Laoshan velodrome track was 370m long for the men and 350m long for the women.